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1. Introduction2. Birth of a Police Force3. The March West4. Establishment of the Force5. The Railroad and the Rebellion6. The Growth of the Force7. Establishment of a National Police Force8. Biographies
 
The North-West Rebellion
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Batoche

Meanwhile, Middleton was on his way toward Batoche. He arrived in Qu'Appelle and after arranging for supplies and wagons to transport his infantry, he left on April 6. The snow and cold hampered their march. The NWMP met the army at a crossing of the North Saskatchewan River where they had 8 scows and boats waiting to move the soldiers across the river.

On April 23, the army camped at Fish Creek. The next day they encountered their first skirmish. The Metis fighters had the advantage, using coulees and forests for cover while Middleton's men were in the open. Eleven soldiers died and 40 were wounded.

Middleton rested his men. On May 7, he started for Batoche, the heart of the rebellion. On May 9 he attacked with almost 900 men. After three days of fighting, Batoche was captured. Louis Riel, Gabriel Dumont and other Metis leaders escaped.

With Batoche taken, the spirit of the rebellion was also gone. Louis Riel was captured and sent to Regina for trial. Dumont and others fled to the United States. Poundmaker surrendered at Battleford and was imprisoned.
Metis scouts caught at Fish Creek
Metis scouts caught at Fish Creek

Batoche is burning.
Batoche is burning.

 
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5. The Railroad and the Rebellion



Duck Lake
Battleford